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Springtime in the Sierras
1947
Costume seen on Jane Frazee as Taffy Baker
On The Old Spanish Trail
1947
Costume seen on Jane Frazee as Candy Martin

Under California Stars
1948
Costume seen on Jane Frazee as Caroline Bullfincher

Publicity Photo of Jane Frazee in the same blouse, likely made for the same photo shoot that gave us the photograph from On The Old Spanish Trail!

 

This costume is very interesting because while it has been seen and used three different times, each time it was used on the same actress! The second time the blouse is seen, it's actually not on the character, but in a photo of her!

Elisabeth wrote in some fascinating information she found about the old B westerns of the day! She speculated that the reason Jane wore the same costume three times is that since Jane made four B-Westerns in a row for Republic Pictures, a low budget studio, which used the same cast, crew and director for all four films, that likely many of the same costumes were used as well- and that this blouse may have even been the property of Jane herself!

She found a book called The Way We Wore by Marsha Hunt, an actress of the 1930s and '40s, which backs up her theory on Jane's wardrobe, as well as discusses various movies of the day and the costumes used for them.

"If you're wondering what happened to all those lovely outfits, once the picture was finished, don't weep for their short lives. They knew reincarnation, over and over, slightly changed and refitted for other actresses in later films...Because of the reworkability of these custom costumes, studios rarely allowed their actresses to buy them. I did manage a couple of purchases from Universal, and treasured them.

"All of this costly couture and effort was of course beyond the means of some independent filmmakers and those on "Poverty Row," those small studios turning out films with six-day shooting schedules. Those "quickie" producers often asked actors to provide their own clothes for modern stories. Or they sent a wardrobe man or woman to pick up lots of likely outfits at local department stores, then show them to all the execs and the actress at the studio, where a selection was made. The chosen clothes were then fitted to the player, and that was that."

The book has several mentions of recycled costumes as well as photographs. It also mentions the costume house The Western Costume Company, which was responsible for clothing many westerns of the day, and still does!

You can check out the Western Costume Company's fascinating website here, or find more information on the book The Way We Wore, here!

Costume Credit
Elisabeth
 
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Have you seen this gown somewhere else? Do you need to be given credit for this sighting? Do you have corrections, additions or changes you would like to make? Please e-mail me!
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RecycledMovieCostumes copyright 2011, website by Katie Bugg Designs.