Current Gallery: Ancient & Medieval / ancientmedieval004

Use the scrollbar to explore costumes in this gallery or select a time period above to visit a different gallery.

Current Gallery: Ancient & Medieval / ancientmedieval004



Select a time period

Use the scrollbar to explore costumes in this gallery or select a time period above to visit a different gallery.

3 1685 80
  • An uncredited actress wearing a a green gown trimmed with brown fur in the episode "The Minstrel" of the 2004 mini-series "Terry Jones' Medieval Lives."
    • BBC

    Terry Jones' Medieval Lives: The Minstrel

    2004

    Costume seen on an uncredited actress

  • Cover of the 2010 edition of the novel "The Queen's Pawn" by Christy English.
    • Penguin Publishing Group

    The Queen's Pawn

    2010

    Costume seen on the cover of a Christy English novel

  • Cover of the 2011 edition of the novel "Queen by Right" by Anne Easter Smith.
    • Simon & Schuster

    Queen by Right

    2011

    Costume seen on the cover of Anne Easter Smith novel

  • Cover of the 2012 edition of the novel "Four Sisters, All Queens" by Sherry Jones.
    • Simon & Schuster

    Four Sisters, All Queens

    2012

    Costume seen on the cover of a Sherry Jones novel

Additional Images

About the Costume

This lovely green gown trimmed with brown fur has been used four times. It first appeared on an uncredited actress for an episode of the BBC historical TV documentary series Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives titled The Minstrel in 2004. In 2010 the gown appeared on the cover of a historical fiction novel by Christy English titled The Queen’s Pawn. In 2011 it appeared on another novel cover, this time for Anne Easter Smith’s novel Queen by Right. The next year in 2012 it appeared again – this time digitally altered to appear blue – on the cover of the historical fiction Four Sisters, All Queens by Sherry Jones.

About the Costume

Have you seen this gown somewhere else? Do you need to be given credit for this sighting? Do you have corrections, additions or changes you would like to make?

Have you ever watched a film and noticed a character walk by in a gown that you just know you’ve seen before? Recycled Movie Costumes is dedicated to documenting the life of a costume through its various appearances on film and television.

Additional Images

About the Costume

This lovely green gown trimmed with brown fur has been used four times. It first appeared on an uncredited actress for an episode of the BBC historical TV documentary series Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives titled The Minstrel in 2004. In 2010 the gown appeared on the cover of a historical fiction novel by Christy English titled The Queen’s Pawn. In 2011 it appeared on another novel cover, this time for Anne Easter Smith’s novel Queen by Right. The next year in 2012 it appeared again – this time digitally altered to appear blue – on the cover of the historical fiction Four Sisters, All Queens by Sherry Jones.

This lovely green gown trimmed with brown fur has been used four times. It first appeared on an uncredited actress for an episode of the BBC historical TV documentary series Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives titled The Minstrel in 2004. In 2010 the gown appeared on the cover of a historical fiction novel by Christy English titled The Queen’s Pawn. In 2011 it appeared on another novel cover, this time for Anne Easter Smith’s novel Queen by Right. The next year in 2012 it appeared again – this time digitally altered to appear blue – on the cover of the historical fiction Four Sisters, All Queens by Sherry Jones.

PRODUCTS YOU
MIGHT LIKE

This page contains affiliate links, meaning at no additional cost to you, Recycled Movie Costumes may earn a small commission. Learn more.

Featured media may not be suitable for all viewers. Viewer discretion and/or services such as VidAngel or The Story Graph are advised. Learn more.

Credits

Sighting Credit:
  • Cintia
  • Lauren
  • Liz
  • S.S. James
Photos provided by:
  • Katie S.
  • Cintia
  • Lauren
  • Liz
  • S.S. James
Costume Designer:
  • Heidi Miller

Disclaimer

This page contains affiliate links, meaning at no additional cost to you, Recycled Movie Costumes may earn a small commission. Learn more.

All intellectual property rights vests with the owner of the copyrighted material. Recycled Movie Costumes is not copying, distributing or using these materials except for entertainment purposes only and deems itself to be protected under the regulations of mandatory law (such as the right to quote), unless otherwise stated. We are happy to remove any material that the copyright owner/trademark owner feels is a violation of their statutory right. Before proceeding with legal measures, contact us at submissions@recycledmoviecostumes.com for us to assist with our cooperation.

The films/television/books and other media represented in the images on this site do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints of Recycled Movie Costumes, and may contain mature content. Viewer discretion is advised, and a service such as VidAngel that filters objectionable content from films and television is recommended. See our full list of suggested websites for navigating content in film, television and books here.

Leave a Comment

Costume Commentary

  1. Das Lied Der Königin – Elizabeth Chadwick (I believe it is the German edition of “The Summer Queen”, judging by the synopsis of the back cover – 2013).

    For the one who said that we never see the back of this costume, here it is!

  2. Do you want to see the red version?? This same costume appears in the cover of “Matilda: Queen of the Conqueror” and “Queen of the Conqueror: The Life of Matilda, Wife of William I”. For me, they’re the same book, but, according to GoodReads, they’re two separated novels…

  3. There is another sighting of this dress in 2001.
    Colette Stevenson as Guinevere wears this dress in Seaon 1 Ep.6(Sir Caradoc and the Round Table) of MythQuest.

  4. And the pendant that appears in “Four Sisters, All Queens”, it was also seen in “The Uncrowned Queen”, a novel by Anne O’Brian (2012)

  5. This one also appears in the cover of “Dragon Lovers”, a book with stories by Jo Beverly, Mary Jo Putney, Karen Harbaugh and Barbara Samuel. It’s from 2007

  6. Don’t forget that oin photo shoots you never see the back. She coudl have bulldog clips up her back to make it fit at the waist. Done it many a time in my own photo shoots.

  7. I’ve looked this one over and tried to find a larger photo. They do look very similar. I think there is a slight possibility it is the same, assuming the collar comes off, but I’m not sure. The fabric doesn’t seem to match. The close up of the gown in blue kind of shows the pattern is set in stripes on the sleeves. I am hoping maybe the photo from the White Queen will be re-edited for further editions (which usually happens with Gregory’s novels) and well get a more full shot of the dress to confirm if it is or is not the same.

  8. Okay so some peoplearesaying thatthis isn’t the same dress well if you look at the second picture you can see that they had to elongate the torso part of the dress. Butthe same belt of green fabric that comes right under the “V” of fur is still therein bothpictures. And also take into count the lighting, lighting can make a purple dress pink or an orange dress red, point is lighting changes the picture. And if your concern is the triangle of fabric hiding the models chests’, it seems like the color might have changed but if you look close the texture and pattern stays the same. Some alterations of the sleeves may have taken place but you can’t really tell from the given pictures.

  9. I was search around and found this picture of the book “The White Queen” by Philippa Gregory. I’m not sure if it’s the same but I couldn’t find any other pictures. The fur on this dress seems to be flatter, less furryand the color of the dress has changes. Photoshop?

  10. Sorry, but just because they don’t look EXACTLY the same doesn’t mean they’re different. Look at the basic dress then you can see that they alter it slightly. This is done all the time in the performing arts. I once acted in Les Mis, and I was given a dress that used to be an 80’s prom dress. I had to wear it in 2 scenes. 1 as a prostetute, and the other as a guest at a wedding. Wouldn’t you be shocked to know that they could look exatly the same. I had the dress altered so that it had stings I could tie it up with, so that it showed my thighs, and wore a low cutcorset, and had the traps hanging off my shoulders. For the wedding scene I let the dress down, and put a high collar jacket on so now the same dress looked proper. Same dress, just altered, and with different accessories. Same went for my other costume, but not as drastic of changes.

  11. They seem to be the same to me – I’d love to hear an elaboration on why you feel they are not the same. They are accessorized differently, the second image having a belt at the waist, but the waistline is still clearly up higher none the less just like on the first one. Are there any details of note that you see that would enable me to confirm that they are not, in fact, the same gown?

Comment

Costume Commentary

  1. Das Lied Der Königin – Elizabeth Chadwick (I believe it is the German edition of “The Summer Queen”, judging by the synopsis of the back cover – 2013).

    For the one who said that we never see the back of this costume, here it is!

  2. Do you want to see the red version?? This same costume appears in the cover of “Matilda: Queen of the Conqueror” and “Queen of the Conqueror: The Life of Matilda, Wife of William I”. For me, they’re the same book, but, according to GoodReads, they’re two separated novels…

  3. There is another sighting of this dress in 2001.
    Colette Stevenson as Guinevere wears this dress in Seaon 1 Ep.6(Sir Caradoc and the Round Table) of MythQuest.

  4. And the pendant that appears in “Four Sisters, All Queens”, it was also seen in “The Uncrowned Queen”, a novel by Anne O’Brian (2012)

  5. This one also appears in the cover of “Dragon Lovers”, a book with stories by Jo Beverly, Mary Jo Putney, Karen Harbaugh and Barbara Samuel. It’s from 2007

  6. Don’t forget that oin photo shoots you never see the back. She coudl have bulldog clips up her back to make it fit at the waist. Done it many a time in my own photo shoots.

  7. I’ve looked this one over and tried to find a larger photo. They do look very similar. I think there is a slight possibility it is the same, assuming the collar comes off, but I’m not sure. The fabric doesn’t seem to match. The close up of the gown in blue kind of shows the pattern is set in stripes on the sleeves. I am hoping maybe the photo from the White Queen will be re-edited for further editions (which usually happens with Gregory’s novels) and well get a more full shot of the dress to confirm if it is or is not the same.

  8. Okay so some peoplearesaying thatthis isn’t the same dress well if you look at the second picture you can see that they had to elongate the torso part of the dress. Butthe same belt of green fabric that comes right under the “V” of fur is still therein bothpictures. And also take into count the lighting, lighting can make a purple dress pink or an orange dress red, point is lighting changes the picture. And if your concern is the triangle of fabric hiding the models chests’, it seems like the color might have changed but if you look close the texture and pattern stays the same. Some alterations of the sleeves may have taken place but you can’t really tell from the given pictures.

  9. I was search around and found this picture of the book “The White Queen” by Philippa Gregory. I’m not sure if it’s the same but I couldn’t find any other pictures. The fur on this dress seems to be flatter, less furryand the color of the dress has changes. Photoshop?

  10. Sorry, but just because they don’t look EXACTLY the same doesn’t mean they’re different. Look at the basic dress then you can see that they alter it slightly. This is done all the time in the performing arts. I once acted in Les Mis, and I was given a dress that used to be an 80’s prom dress. I had to wear it in 2 scenes. 1 as a prostetute, and the other as a guest at a wedding. Wouldn’t you be shocked to know that they could look exatly the same. I had the dress altered so that it had stings I could tie it up with, so that it showed my thighs, and wore a low cutcorset, and had the traps hanging off my shoulders. For the wedding scene I let the dress down, and put a high collar jacket on so now the same dress looked proper. Same dress, just altered, and with different accessories. Same went for my other costume, but not as drastic of changes.

  11. They seem to be the same to me – I’d love to hear an elaboration on why you feel they are not the same. They are accessorized differently, the second image having a belt at the waist, but the waistline is still clearly up higher none the less just like on the first one. Are there any details of note that you see that would enable me to confirm that they are not, in fact, the same gown?

Comment

Make an Edit

Do you have more information to add to this page?
Do you have a brand new costume to share? 

Costume Commentary

  1. Das Lied Der Königin – Elizabeth Chadwick (I believe it is the German edition of “The Summer Queen”, judging by the synopsis of the back cover – 2013).

    For the one who said that we never see the back of this costume, here it is!

  2. Do you want to see the red version?? This same costume appears in the cover of “Matilda: Queen of the Conqueror” and “Queen of the Conqueror: The Life of Matilda, Wife of William I”. For me, they’re the same book, but, according to GoodReads, they’re two separated novels…

  3. There is another sighting of this dress in 2001.
    Colette Stevenson as Guinevere wears this dress in Seaon 1 Ep.6(Sir Caradoc and the Round Table) of MythQuest.

  4. And the pendant that appears in “Four Sisters, All Queens”, it was also seen in “The Uncrowned Queen”, a novel by Anne O’Brian (2012)

  5. This one also appears in the cover of “Dragon Lovers”, a book with stories by Jo Beverly, Mary Jo Putney, Karen Harbaugh and Barbara Samuel. It’s from 2007

  6. Don’t forget that oin photo shoots you never see the back. She coudl have bulldog clips up her back to make it fit at the waist. Done it many a time in my own photo shoots.

  7. I’ve looked this one over and tried to find a larger photo. They do look very similar. I think there is a slight possibility it is the same, assuming the collar comes off, but I’m not sure. The fabric doesn’t seem to match. The close up of the gown in blue kind of shows the pattern is set in stripes on the sleeves. I am hoping maybe the photo from the White Queen will be re-edited for further editions (which usually happens with Gregory’s novels) and well get a more full shot of the dress to confirm if it is or is not the same.

  8. Okay so some peoplearesaying thatthis isn’t the same dress well if you look at the second picture you can see that they had to elongate the torso part of the dress. Butthe same belt of green fabric that comes right under the “V” of fur is still therein bothpictures. And also take into count the lighting, lighting can make a purple dress pink or an orange dress red, point is lighting changes the picture. And if your concern is the triangle of fabric hiding the models chests’, it seems like the color might have changed but if you look close the texture and pattern stays the same. Some alterations of the sleeves may have taken place but you can’t really tell from the given pictures.

  9. I was search around and found this picture of the book “The White Queen” by Philippa Gregory. I’m not sure if it’s the same but I couldn’t find any other pictures. The fur on this dress seems to be flatter, less furryand the color of the dress has changes. Photoshop?

  10. Sorry, but just because they don’t look EXACTLY the same doesn’t mean they’re different. Look at the basic dress then you can see that they alter it slightly. This is done all the time in the performing arts. I once acted in Les Mis, and I was given a dress that used to be an 80’s prom dress. I had to wear it in 2 scenes. 1 as a prostetute, and the other as a guest at a wedding. Wouldn’t you be shocked to know that they could look exatly the same. I had the dress altered so that it had stings I could tie it up with, so that it showed my thighs, and wore a low cutcorset, and had the traps hanging off my shoulders. For the wedding scene I let the dress down, and put a high collar jacket on so now the same dress looked proper. Same dress, just altered, and with different accessories. Same went for my other costume, but not as drastic of changes.

  11. They seem to be the same to me – I’d love to hear an elaboration on why you feel they are not the same. They are accessorized differently, the second image having a belt at the waist, but the waistline is still clearly up higher none the less just like on the first one. Are there any details of note that you see that would enable me to confirm that they are not, in fact, the same gown?

Comment