Current Gallery: Props / props008

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Current Gallery: Props / props008



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  • A boat bed as a prop in Jacqueline de Séverac's bedroom in the 1922 film "Trifling Women."
    • Metro Pictures Corporation

    Trifling Women

    1922

    Jacqueline de Séverac's bed

  • A boat bed as a prop in the Phantom's lair in the 1925 film "The Phantom of the Opera."
    • Universal Pictures

    The Phantom of the Opera

    1925

    Bed in the Phantom's lair

  • A boat bed as a prop in Lily Garland's bedroom in the 1934 film "Twentieth Century."
    • Columbia Pictures

    Twentieth Century

    1934

    Lily Garland's bed

  • A boat bed used as a prop in Norma Desmond's bedroom in the 1950 film "Sunset Boulevard."
    • Paramount Pictures

    Sunset Boulevard

    1950

    Norma Desmond's bed

  • A boat bed used as a prop in the dream sequence in the 1964 film "Good Neighbor Sam."
    • Columbia Pictures

    Good Neighbor Sam

    1964

    Dream Sequence bed

  • A green and brown boat bed at the Pewter Plough Playhouse in 2003.

    Pewter Plough Playhouse

    2003

    prop for plays

Additional Images

About the Costume

This is only our second sighting of a reused item from the silent era – the other being a costume from the 1922 film Lorna Doone. The story of this magnificent bed in the shape of a boat begins with Gaby Deslys, a famous French actress, singer, and dancer. Information shows that she had a large bed in the form of a swan, as well as a bed in the shape of a boat.

Her carved and gilded bed was inspired by the boat in the “Grotto of Venus” scene from the opera “Tannhauser”. On its bow, there are two boiseries with images from Boucher’s “Cupid’s Target”.

Gaby died in 1920 at age 38 from complications due to Spanish Influenza. Some of her items were auctioned off, and the bed was purchased in Marseilles by Metro Pictures for use in films.

The first appearance of the bed was in the 1922 film Trifling Women. A promotional photo from the movie appeared on page 59 of the July 1922 edition of Photoplay, in which Barbara La Marr, who stars as Jacqueline de Séverac in the film, was shown reclining on the bed. The bed was used again in the 1925 film The Phantom of the Opera, and in 1934 it was seen in the film Twentieth Century.  In 1950 it made what is likely its most famous appearance in Sunset Boulevard as the bed of Norma Desmond. The last known film appearance seems to be 1964, where it turned up in a dream sequence in the movie Good Neighbor Sam.

After appearing in films, the bed appears to have been purchased by Jim Buckley, founder of Cambria’s Pewter Plough Playhouse. Upon his death in 2015, The Cambrian reported:

During his career, Buckley purchased a large selection of movie memorabilia, some of which wound up in Cambria when he moved there with his wife in the mid-1970s.

It was there that he opened the Pewter Plough, an antique store in Cambria’s West Village, and displayed some of his cinema keepsakes.

His inspiration to build a separate museum to house those treasures, however, was sidetracked when he came up with a better idea: using the space as a theater.

Where the bed has gone in the years since Buckley’s death is not known. If you have any information about this marvelous prop that is over 100 years old, please do let us know!

About the Costume

Have you seen this gown somewhere else? Do you need to be given credit for this sighting? Do you have corrections, additions or changes you would like to make?

Have you ever watched a film and noticed a character walk by in a gown that you just know you’ve seen before? Recycled Movie Costumes is dedicated to documenting the life of a costume through its various appearances on film and television.

Additional Images

About the Costume

This is only our second sighting of a reused item from the silent era – the other being a costume from the 1922 film Lorna Doone. The story of this magnificent bed in the shape of a boat begins with Gaby Deslys, a famous French actress, singer, and dancer. Information shows that she had a large bed in the form of a swan, as well as a bed in the shape of a boat.

Her carved and gilded bed was inspired by the boat in the “Grotto of Venus” scene from the opera “Tannhauser”. On its bow, there are two boiseries with images from Boucher’s “Cupid’s Target”.

Gaby died in 1920 at age 38 from complications due to Spanish Influenza. Some of her items were auctioned off, and the bed was purchased in Marseilles by Metro Pictures for use in films.

The first appearance of the bed was in the 1922 film Trifling Women. A promotional photo from the movie appeared on page 59 of the July 1922 edition of Photoplay, in which Barbara La Marr, who stars as Jacqueline de Séverac in the film, was shown reclining on the bed. The bed was used again in the 1925 film The Phantom of the Opera, and in 1934 it was seen in the film Twentieth Century.  In 1950 it made what is likely its most famous appearance in Sunset Boulevard as the bed of Norma Desmond. The last known film appearance seems to be 1964, where it turned up in a dream sequence in the movie Good Neighbor Sam.

After appearing in films, the bed appears to have been purchased by Jim Buckley, founder of Cambria’s Pewter Plough Playhouse. Upon his death in 2015, The Cambrian reported:

During his career, Buckley purchased a large selection of movie memorabilia, some of which wound up in Cambria when he moved there with his wife in the mid-1970s.

It was there that he opened the Pewter Plough, an antique store in Cambria’s West Village, and displayed some of his cinema keepsakes.

His inspiration to build a separate museum to house those treasures, however, was sidetracked when he came up with a better idea: using the space as a theater.

Where the bed has gone in the years since Buckley’s death is not known. If you have any information about this marvelous prop that is over 100 years old, please do let us know!

This is only our second sighting of a reused item from the silent era – the other being a costume from the 1922 film Lorna Doone. The story of this magnificent bed in the shape of a boat begins with Gaby Deslys, a famous French actress, singer, and dancer. Information shows that she had a large bed in the form of a swan, as well as a bed in the shape of a boat.

Her carved and gilded bed was inspired by the boat in the “Grotto of Venus” scene from the opera “Tannhauser”. On its bow, there are two boiseries with images from Boucher’s “Cupid’s Target”.

Gaby died in 1920 at age 38 from complications due to Spanish Influenza. Some of her items were auctioned off, and the bed was purchased in Marseilles by Metro Pictures for use in films.

The first appearance of the bed was in the 1922 film Trifling Women. A promotional photo from the movie appeared on page 59 of the July 1922 edition of Photoplay, in which Barbara La Marr, who stars as Jacqueline de Séverac in the film, was shown reclining on the bed. The bed was used again in the 1925 film The Phantom of the Opera, and in 1934 it was seen in the film Twentieth Century.  In 1950 it made what is likely its most famous appearance in Sunset Boulevard as the bed of Norma Desmond. The last known film appearance seems to be 1964, where it turned up in a dream sequence in the movie Good Neighbor Sam.

After appearing in films, the bed appears to have been purchased by Jim Buckley, founder of Cambria’s Pewter Plough Playhouse. Upon his death in 2015, The Cambrian reported:

During his career, Buckley purchased a large selection of movie memorabilia, some of which wound up in Cambria when he moved there with his wife in the mid-1970s.

It was there that he opened the Pewter Plough, an antique store in Cambria’s West Village, and displayed some of his cinema keepsakes.

His inspiration to build a separate museum to house those treasures, however, was sidetracked when he came up with a better idea: using the space as a theater.

Where the bed has gone in the years since Buckley’s death is not known. If you have any information about this marvelous prop that is over 100 years old, please do let us know!

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Credits

Sighting Credit:
  • Belinda
  • She Blogged By Night
Costume Designer:
  • Unknown

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Leave a Comment

Costume Commentary

  1. This design could easily be reproduced. In fact, it would cost less to reproduce then to buy from its present owner.
    The orniment on it looks like compo from Decorators Supply Corp. catalogue 124.
    There some rudimentary hand carved workings on the bow.
    I find the headboard design, either over done or just unratable. It’s baroque in style, but it looks very cleverly made up by someone like me. Lol! ……a weekend brainstorm of creativity to be sure.
    I can’t decide if I like it or hate it.
    I do like the dias it’s set upon….like a plinth. I would’ve made it lighter and hung it from real sisal rope…..yes, from a very strong ceiling. Lol

  2. This was very informative. Awesome to see how far back the bed goes. I saw it on TCM’s movie Twentieth Century with Lionel Barrymore & Carole Lombard.

  3. Has anyone contacted Buckly’s family? Perhaps they kept records of when it was sold or maybe a family member owns it. What about Mae West’s Swan bed. Is it still around?

    I would love to know more about Gaby’s bed as well. Did she commission an artist to create it or?

  4. I noticed this bed in the film “Sunset Boulevard.” This is an art piece, a celebration of France, Hollywood, wealth, success and just plain girly and fun! So sad we don’t know where it is I just cannot believe that the props department was not more responsible with this magnificent conversation and think of the historical value. Who made it and where was it made.

    If anyone knows any history or finds this bed please, please post.

Comment

Costume Commentary

  1. This design could easily be reproduced. In fact, it would cost less to reproduce then to buy from its present owner.
    The orniment on it looks like compo from Decorators Supply Corp. catalogue 124.
    There some rudimentary hand carved workings on the bow.
    I find the headboard design, either over done or just unratable. It’s baroque in style, but it looks very cleverly made up by someone like me. Lol! ……a weekend brainstorm of creativity to be sure.
    I can’t decide if I like it or hate it.
    I do like the dias it’s set upon….like a plinth. I would’ve made it lighter and hung it from real sisal rope…..yes, from a very strong ceiling. Lol

  2. This was very informative. Awesome to see how far back the bed goes. I saw it on TCM’s movie Twentieth Century with Lionel Barrymore & Carole Lombard.

  3. Has anyone contacted Buckly’s family? Perhaps they kept records of when it was sold or maybe a family member owns it. What about Mae West’s Swan bed. Is it still around?

    I would love to know more about Gaby’s bed as well. Did she commission an artist to create it or?

  4. I noticed this bed in the film “Sunset Boulevard.” This is an art piece, a celebration of France, Hollywood, wealth, success and just plain girly and fun! So sad we don’t know where it is I just cannot believe that the props department was not more responsible with this magnificent conversation and think of the historical value. Who made it and where was it made.

    If anyone knows any history or finds this bed please, please post.

Comment

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Costume Commentary

  1. This design could easily be reproduced. In fact, it would cost less to reproduce then to buy from its present owner.
    The orniment on it looks like compo from Decorators Supply Corp. catalogue 124.
    There some rudimentary hand carved workings on the bow.
    I find the headboard design, either over done or just unratable. It’s baroque in style, but it looks very cleverly made up by someone like me. Lol! ……a weekend brainstorm of creativity to be sure.
    I can’t decide if I like it or hate it.
    I do like the dias it’s set upon….like a plinth. I would’ve made it lighter and hung it from real sisal rope…..yes, from a very strong ceiling. Lol

  2. This was very informative. Awesome to see how far back the bed goes. I saw it on TCM’s movie Twentieth Century with Lionel Barrymore & Carole Lombard.

  3. Has anyone contacted Buckly’s family? Perhaps they kept records of when it was sold or maybe a family member owns it. What about Mae West’s Swan bed. Is it still around?

    I would love to know more about Gaby’s bed as well. Did she commission an artist to create it or?

  4. I noticed this bed in the film “Sunset Boulevard.” This is an art piece, a celebration of France, Hollywood, wealth, success and just plain girly and fun! So sad we don’t know where it is I just cannot believe that the props department was not more responsible with this magnificent conversation and think of the historical value. Who made it and where was it made.

    If anyone knows any history or finds this bed please, please post.

Comment