Current Gallery: Accessories / accessories

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Current Gallery: Accessories / accessories



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  • Keith Michell as King Henry VIII wearing a gold chain of office adorned with orange stones in the 1972 film "Henry VIII and His Six Wives."
    • BBC

    Henry VIII and His Six Wives

    1972

    Costume seen on Keith Michell as King Henry VIII

  • Timothy West as King Francis wearing a gold chain of office adorned with orange stones in the 1998 film "Ever After."
    • Twentieth Century Studios

    Ever After

    1998

    Costume seen on Timothy West as King Francis

  • Chris Larkin as Young King Henry VIII wearing a gold chain of office adorned with orange stones in the 2001 mini-series "The Six Wives of Henry VIII."
    • Channel 4 Television Corporation

    The Six Wives of Henry VIII

    2001

    Costume seen on Chris Larkin as Young King Henry VIII

  • Andy Rashleigh as Older King Henry VIII wearing a gold chain of office adorned with orange stones in the 2001 mini-series "The Six Wives of Henry VIII."
    • Channel 4 Television Corporation

    The Six Wives of Henry VIII

    2001

    Costume seen on Andy Rashleigh as Older King Henry VIII

  • An uncredited actor as King Henry VIII wearing a gold chain of office adorned with orange stones in the episode "King and Emperor" of the 2005 series "Monarchy."
    • Channel 4 Television Corporation
    • PBS

    Monarchy: Henry VIII: King and Emperor

    2005

    Costume seen on an uncredited actor as King Henry VIII

Additional Images

About the Costume

This gold state chain with orange stones was created for Keith Michell playing King Henry VIII in the 1972 production of Henry VIII and His Six Wives. It was next worn by Timothy West for his performance as King Francis in 1998’s Ever After. For 2001’s The Six Wives of Henry VIII it can be seen on two actors – first on Chris Larkin as a young King Henry VIII, and later on Andy Rashleigh as an older King Henry VIII. The chain was sighted once more on an uncredited actor as King Henry VIII in the British television series Monarchy in the 2005 episode Henry VIII: King and Emperor. The chain, along with the full costume was on display at the fashion museum in Bath. To learn more, go here.

About the Costume

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Have you ever watched a film and noticed a character walk by in a gown that you just know you’ve seen before? Recycled Movie Costumes is dedicated to documenting the life of a costume through its various appearances on film and television.

Additional Images

About the Costume

This gold state chain with orange stones was created for Keith Michell playing King Henry VIII in the 1972 production of Henry VIII and His Six Wives. It was next worn by Timothy West for his performance as King Francis in 1998’s Ever After. For 2001’s The Six Wives of Henry VIII it can be seen on two actors – first on Chris Larkin as a young King Henry VIII, and later on Andy Rashleigh as an older King Henry VIII. The chain was sighted once more on an uncredited actor as King Henry VIII in the British television series Monarchy in the 2005 episode Henry VIII: King and Emperor. The chain, along with the full costume was on display at the fashion museum in Bath. To learn more, go here.

This gold state chain with orange stones was created for Keith Michell playing King Henry VIII in the 1972 production of Henry VIII and His Six Wives. It was next worn by Timothy West for his performance as King Francis in 1998’s Ever After. For 2001’s The Six Wives of Henry VIII it can be seen on two actors – first on Chris Larkin as a young King Henry VIII, and later on Andy Rashleigh as an older King Henry VIII. The chain was sighted once more on an uncredited actor as King Henry VIII in the British television series Monarchy in the 2005 episode Henry VIII: King and Emperor. The chain, along with the full costume was on display at the fashion museum in Bath. To learn more, go here.

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Credits

Sighting Credit:
Photos provided by:
Costume Designer:
  • John Bloomfield

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Costume Commentary

    • Is it certain the image of Keith Michell above is from HVIII and his Six Wives? I’ve been exploring the website of the hatmaker who made his HVIII hat for The Prince and the Pauper, and the hat is identical.
      http://www.janesmithhats.co.uk

      Google images show a different hat for HVIII and his Six Wives, and there are websites identifying images from TPATP that look exactly like the hat above. Plus Michell’s age in the photo doesn’t jibe with 1972?

      Incidentally, superb interview with Jane Smith on her career making hats for UK tv and film. She did the Foxite hat and all of the hats for K Knightley in The Duchess, plus other amazing film hats.
      http://www.hattin-around.com/?tag=glynebourne

      • I think you’re absolutely right. Thank you very much for pointing that out.

        These hats are AMAZING! Thanks for the interview – I will watch it after work today! Thanks!

        • Yw! The interview is a sound recording, not video. There are notes along with it, to help you follow along. What a fascinating career she’s had, and now going stronger than ever!

          • Okay, I listened to it, and it was AWESOME! I mean, I knew it would be interesting, but I had no idea I would love it as much as I did. WOW! I love that she started on “Anne of the thousand Days” (the movie that got me interested in history – so it’s very special to me). I thought the most fascinating thing she said was about women saying “nothing fits me” – and that it was because hat makers were still using old hat bases to fit women with perms! What an interesting and extraordinary little fact! Thank you so much for sharing this with me! I’ll need to post some of this info!

            • Yes, it really was entertaining. The part about the riots was also very interesting, as was the mention of how design had changed, becoming historically accurate. I loled at the part when she said early on that her bonnets were still in use at the BBC years later because she’d made them so strong.

  1. I don’t think it’s just the chain and hat, it looks like the whole costume is being reused. At the very least the doublet is. Maybe this should be moved to the Tudors folder.

  2. You know what? I’m no longer convinced of Richard Burton’s cap. But if the upper picture is from a “Henry VIII”-actor of David Starkey’s monarchy-series (2004), the “Henry VIII”-actor of his series “The six wives of Henry VIII” (1997) wears the same barett.

  3. Tymothy Wests Ever After Crown was worn by the King Claudius (Donald Sumpter) in “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead” (1990) and I believe King Henrys barett/cap in the right picture with Andy Rashleigh originates from “Anne of the Thousand Days” and was worn by Richard Burton.

Comment

Costume Commentary

    • Is it certain the image of Keith Michell above is from HVIII and his Six Wives? I’ve been exploring the website of the hatmaker who made his HVIII hat for The Prince and the Pauper, and the hat is identical.
      http://www.janesmithhats.co.uk

      Google images show a different hat for HVIII and his Six Wives, and there are websites identifying images from TPATP that look exactly like the hat above. Plus Michell’s age in the photo doesn’t jibe with 1972?

      Incidentally, superb interview with Jane Smith on her career making hats for UK tv and film. She did the Foxite hat and all of the hats for K Knightley in The Duchess, plus other amazing film hats.
      http://www.hattin-around.com/?tag=glynebourne

      • I think you’re absolutely right. Thank you very much for pointing that out.

        These hats are AMAZING! Thanks for the interview – I will watch it after work today! Thanks!

        • Yw! The interview is a sound recording, not video. There are notes along with it, to help you follow along. What a fascinating career she’s had, and now going stronger than ever!

          • Okay, I listened to it, and it was AWESOME! I mean, I knew it would be interesting, but I had no idea I would love it as much as I did. WOW! I love that she started on “Anne of the thousand Days” (the movie that got me interested in history – so it’s very special to me). I thought the most fascinating thing she said was about women saying “nothing fits me” – and that it was because hat makers were still using old hat bases to fit women with perms! What an interesting and extraordinary little fact! Thank you so much for sharing this with me! I’ll need to post some of this info!

            • Yes, it really was entertaining. The part about the riots was also very interesting, as was the mention of how design had changed, becoming historically accurate. I loled at the part when she said early on that her bonnets were still in use at the BBC years later because she’d made them so strong.

  1. I don’t think it’s just the chain and hat, it looks like the whole costume is being reused. At the very least the doublet is. Maybe this should be moved to the Tudors folder.

  2. You know what? I’m no longer convinced of Richard Burton’s cap. But if the upper picture is from a “Henry VIII”-actor of David Starkey’s monarchy-series (2004), the “Henry VIII”-actor of his series “The six wives of Henry VIII” (1997) wears the same barett.

  3. Tymothy Wests Ever After Crown was worn by the King Claudius (Donald Sumpter) in “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead” (1990) and I believe King Henrys barett/cap in the right picture with Andy Rashleigh originates from “Anne of the Thousand Days” and was worn by Richard Burton.

Comment

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Costume Commentary

    • Is it certain the image of Keith Michell above is from HVIII and his Six Wives? I’ve been exploring the website of the hatmaker who made his HVIII hat for The Prince and the Pauper, and the hat is identical.
      http://www.janesmithhats.co.uk

      Google images show a different hat for HVIII and his Six Wives, and there are websites identifying images from TPATP that look exactly like the hat above. Plus Michell’s age in the photo doesn’t jibe with 1972?

      Incidentally, superb interview with Jane Smith on her career making hats for UK tv and film. She did the Foxite hat and all of the hats for K Knightley in The Duchess, plus other amazing film hats.
      http://www.hattin-around.com/?tag=glynebourne

      • I think you’re absolutely right. Thank you very much for pointing that out.

        These hats are AMAZING! Thanks for the interview – I will watch it after work today! Thanks!

        • Yw! The interview is a sound recording, not video. There are notes along with it, to help you follow along. What a fascinating career she’s had, and now going stronger than ever!

          • Okay, I listened to it, and it was AWESOME! I mean, I knew it would be interesting, but I had no idea I would love it as much as I did. WOW! I love that she started on “Anne of the thousand Days” (the movie that got me interested in history – so it’s very special to me). I thought the most fascinating thing she said was about women saying “nothing fits me” – and that it was because hat makers were still using old hat bases to fit women with perms! What an interesting and extraordinary little fact! Thank you so much for sharing this with me! I’ll need to post some of this info!

            • Yes, it really was entertaining. The part about the riots was also very interesting, as was the mention of how design had changed, becoming historically accurate. I loled at the part when she said early on that her bonnets were still in use at the BBC years later because she’d made them so strong.

  1. I don’t think it’s just the chain and hat, it looks like the whole costume is being reused. At the very least the doublet is. Maybe this should be moved to the Tudors folder.

  2. You know what? I’m no longer convinced of Richard Burton’s cap. But if the upper picture is from a “Henry VIII”-actor of David Starkey’s monarchy-series (2004), the “Henry VIII”-actor of his series “The six wives of Henry VIII” (1997) wears the same barett.

  3. Tymothy Wests Ever After Crown was worn by the King Claudius (Donald Sumpter) in “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead” (1990) and I believe King Henrys barett/cap in the right picture with Andy Rashleigh originates from “Anne of the Thousand Days” and was worn by Richard Burton.

Comment