Current Gallery: Tudor & Elizabethan / tudorelizabethan112

Use the scrollbar to explore costumes in this gallery or select a time period above to visit a different gallery.

3 1685 80
    • RKO Radio Pictures

    Mary of Scotland

    1936

    Costume seen on Anita Colby as Mary Fleming

    • Twentieth Century Studios

    The Virgin Queen

    1955

    Costume seen on Leslie Parrish as Anne

    • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

    The Pit and the Pendulum

    1961

    Costume seen on Barbara Steele as Elizabeth Medina

    • United Artists

    Beauty and the Beast

    1962

    Costume seen on Joyce Taylor as Althea

Additional Images

About the Costume

It would be difficult to identify this costume as the same one were it not for the fact that some of the history of this dress has been documented.

Walter Plunkett designed the costume for the 1936 film Mary of Scotland, where Anita Colby wore it as Mary Fleming. A label bearing Anita’s name is still in the garment to this day. In 1955, designer Mary Willis oversaw the adaptation of this gown for use in The Virgin Queen, where Leslie Parrish wore it as the character Anne. The sleeves were adjusted slightly, the bodice was split, and an insert was added. From there, the dress went on to be used in the 1961 film The Pit and the Pendulum by Barbara Steele as Elizabeth Medina. Several promotional images of Barbara Steele help show more of the detail that went into the costume and also gives us a much better look at the color of the garment and fabrics that make it up. In 1962, Joyce Taylor wore the costume as Althea in Beauty and the Beast. In order to give the gown a more 18th-century look, the sleeves were drastically shortened, lace engageantes (flounces) were added, and the skirt was pulled up to make the swagged skirt of a polonaise.

Eventually, the gown was sold at the great MGM auction of 1970, where Debbie Reynolds purchased it. Eventually, she sold her collection, and a private collector purchased it in May of 2014. The auction listing for the dress describes it as follows:

Celadon green brocade period dress with pink, peach and yellow flowers and green leaves. Square neckline, three-quarter length sleeves with ruffles, both trimmed in delicate ivory lace. Pale salmon satin insert down front. Hook & eye with snap back closure. Internal bias label handwritten, “Marjorie Hellen” and “COLBY C-1508”. Material on bottom is frayed with a few separations and soiling under arms… the gown was modified – sleeves shortened, shoulder caps removed, and satin insert added along bodice….Sides of skirt gathered post-production.

 

About the Costume

Have you seen this gown somewhere else? Do you need to be given credit for this sighting? Do you have corrections, additions or changes you would like to make?

Have you ever watched a film and noticed a character walk by in a gown that you just know you’ve seen before? Recycled Movie Costumes is dedicated to documenting the life of a costume through its various appearances on film and television.

Additional Images

About the Costume

It would be difficult to identify this costume as the same one were it not for the fact that some of the history of this dress has been documented.

Walter Plunkett designed the costume for the 1936 film Mary of Scotland, where Anita Colby wore it as Mary Fleming. A label bearing Anita’s name is still in the garment to this day. In 1955, designer Mary Willis oversaw the adaptation of this gown for use in The Virgin Queen, where Leslie Parrish wore it as the character Anne. The sleeves were adjusted slightly, the bodice was split, and an insert was added. From there, the dress went on to be used in the 1961 film The Pit and the Pendulum by Barbara Steele as Elizabeth Medina. Several promotional images of Barbara Steele help show more of the detail that went into the costume and also gives us a much better look at the color of the garment and fabrics that make it up. In 1962, Joyce Taylor wore the costume as Althea in Beauty and the Beast. In order to give the gown a more 18th-century look, the sleeves were drastically shortened, lace engageantes (flounces) were added, and the skirt was pulled up to make the swagged skirt of a polonaise.

Eventually, the gown was sold at the great MGM auction of 1970, where Debbie Reynolds purchased it. Eventually, she sold her collection, and a private collector purchased it in May of 2014. The auction listing for the dress describes it as follows:

Celadon green brocade period dress with pink, peach and yellow flowers and green leaves. Square neckline, three-quarter length sleeves with ruffles, both trimmed in delicate ivory lace. Pale salmon satin insert down front. Hook & eye with snap back closure. Internal bias label handwritten, “Marjorie Hellen” and “COLBY C-1508”. Material on bottom is frayed with a few separations and soiling under arms… the gown was modified – sleeves shortened, shoulder caps removed, and satin insert added along bodice….Sides of skirt gathered post-production.

 

It would be difficult to identify this costume as the same one were it not for the fact that some of the history of this dress has been documented.

Walter Plunkett designed the costume for the 1936 film Mary of Scotland, where Anita Colby wore it as Mary Fleming. A label bearing Anita’s name is still in the garment to this day. In 1955, designer Mary Willis oversaw the adaptation of this gown for use in The Virgin Queen, where Leslie Parrish wore it as the character Anne. The sleeves were adjusted slightly, the bodice was split, and an insert was added. From there, the dress went on to be used in the 1961 film The Pit and the Pendulum by Barbara Steele as Elizabeth Medina. Several promotional images of Barbara Steele help show more of the detail that went into the costume and also gives us a much better look at the color of the garment and fabrics that make it up. In 1962, Joyce Taylor wore the costume as Althea in Beauty and the Beast. In order to give the gown a more 18th-century look, the sleeves were drastically shortened, lace engageantes (flounces) were added, and the skirt was pulled up to make the swagged skirt of a polonaise.

Eventually, the gown was sold at the great MGM auction of 1970, where Debbie Reynolds purchased it. Eventually, she sold her collection, and a private collector purchased it in May of 2014. The auction listing for the dress describes it as follows:

Celadon green brocade period dress with pink, peach and yellow flowers and green leaves. Square neckline, three-quarter length sleeves with ruffles, both trimmed in delicate ivory lace. Pale salmon satin insert down front. Hook & eye with snap back closure. Internal bias label handwritten, “Marjorie Hellen” and “COLBY C-1508”. Material on bottom is frayed with a few separations and soiling under arms… the gown was modified – sleeves shortened, shoulder caps removed, and satin insert added along bodice….Sides of skirt gathered post-production.

 

Credits

Sighting Credit:
  • Michael
  • Katie S.
Photos provided by:
Costume Designer:
  • Walter Plunkett

Disclaimer

All intellectual property rights vests with the owner of the copyrighted material. Recycled Movie Costumes is not copying, distributing and using these materials except for entertainment purposes only and deems itself to be protected under the regulations of mandatory law (such as the right to quote), unless otherwise stated for certain material. We are happy to take down any material that the copyright owner/trademark owner feels is a violation of their statutory right. Before proceeding with the legal measures, we request the alleged aggrieved to contact us at [email protected] for us to assist them with our cooperation.

The films/television shows/books and other media represented in the images on this website do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints of Recycled Movie Costumes. Said media may contain mature content. Viewer discretion is advised at all times.

Leave a Comment

Comment

Make an Edit

Do you have more information to add to this page?
Do you have a brand new costume to share? 

Comment