Current Gallery: Regency & Romantic Victorian & Edwardian / victorianedwardian026

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Current Gallery: Regency & Romantic Victorian & Edwardian / victorianedwardian026



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  • Greer Garson as Elizabeth Bennet wearing a polka dot gown in the 1940 film "Pride and Prejudice."
    • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

    Pride and Prejudice

    1940

    Costume seen on Greer Garson as Elizabeth Bennet

  • An extra wearing a white polka dot gown in the 1948 film "The Pirate."
    • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

    The Pirate

    1948

    Costume seen on an extra

Additional Images

About the Costume

This fantastic polka-dotted gown was first seen in the 1940 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, where it was worn by Greer Garson as Elizabeth Bennet. The gown was spotted once more on an uncredited extra in 1948’s The Pirate.

About the Costume

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Have you ever watched a film and noticed a character walk by in a gown that you just know you’ve seen before? Recycled Movie Costumes is dedicated to documenting the life of a costume through its various appearances on film and television.

Additional Images

About the Costume

This fantastic polka-dotted gown was first seen in the 1940 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, where it was worn by Greer Garson as Elizabeth Bennet. The gown was spotted once more on an uncredited extra in 1948’s The Pirate.

This fantastic polka-dotted gown was first seen in the 1940 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, where it was worn by Greer Garson as Elizabeth Bennet. The gown was spotted once more on an uncredited extra in 1948’s The Pirate.

Credits

Sighting Credit:
Photos provided by:
Costume Designer:
  • Adrian (Adrian Adolph Greenburg)

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Costume Commentary

  1. The 1940 movie, “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE” did not have any Victorian costumes. Why do people keep making that mistake? If those dresses were Victorian, the above costume would have never appeared in “THE PIRATE”, which was set during the 1820s. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE” with Greer Garson was set either in the late 1820s or the early 1830s.
    And the Jane Austen novel was set during the end of the 1790s, despite being published in 1813. People keep making that mistake as well.

  2. From IMDB: “Although Jane Austen’s novel was set in Regency England (late 18th-early 19th century), the period was set at a later time. This anachronism has been explained in a couple of ways. Those more favourably disposed to the studio system claim the styles of the Regency Period (when women’s dresses resembled nightgowns) were thought too plain for public taste, so new gowns were created in the voluminous Victorian style of the 1830s to give it a more romantic flair. Others have pointed out that because MGM wasn’t willing to put a huge budget behind the risky venture, costumes left over fromGone with the Wind (1939) were altered slightly and placed on background players to save money. New gowns in the same flouncy style were designed for the female leads.”

    • Thanks! I’ve heard this rumored several times, but have yet to find any evidence toward it. If you find any, please do let me know! I’d love to post them!

Comment

Costume Commentary

  1. The 1940 movie, “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE” did not have any Victorian costumes. Why do people keep making that mistake? If those dresses were Victorian, the above costume would have never appeared in “THE PIRATE”, which was set during the 1820s. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE” with Greer Garson was set either in the late 1820s or the early 1830s.
    And the Jane Austen novel was set during the end of the 1790s, despite being published in 1813. People keep making that mistake as well.

  2. From IMDB: “Although Jane Austen’s novel was set in Regency England (late 18th-early 19th century), the period was set at a later time. This anachronism has been explained in a couple of ways. Those more favourably disposed to the studio system claim the styles of the Regency Period (when women’s dresses resembled nightgowns) were thought too plain for public taste, so new gowns were created in the voluminous Victorian style of the 1830s to give it a more romantic flair. Others have pointed out that because MGM wasn’t willing to put a huge budget behind the risky venture, costumes left over fromGone with the Wind (1939) were altered slightly and placed on background players to save money. New gowns in the same flouncy style were designed for the female leads.”

    • Thanks! I’ve heard this rumored several times, but have yet to find any evidence toward it. If you find any, please do let me know! I’d love to post them!

Comment

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Costume Commentary

  1. The 1940 movie, “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE” did not have any Victorian costumes. Why do people keep making that mistake? If those dresses were Victorian, the above costume would have never appeared in “THE PIRATE”, which was set during the 1820s. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE” with Greer Garson was set either in the late 1820s or the early 1830s.
    And the Jane Austen novel was set during the end of the 1790s, despite being published in 1813. People keep making that mistake as well.

  2. From IMDB: “Although Jane Austen’s novel was set in Regency England (late 18th-early 19th century), the period was set at a later time. This anachronism has been explained in a couple of ways. Those more favourably disposed to the studio system claim the styles of the Regency Period (when women’s dresses resembled nightgowns) were thought too plain for public taste, so new gowns were created in the voluminous Victorian style of the 1830s to give it a more romantic flair. Others have pointed out that because MGM wasn’t willing to put a huge budget behind the risky venture, costumes left over fromGone with the Wind (1939) were altered slightly and placed on background players to save money. New gowns in the same flouncy style were designed for the female leads.”

    • Thanks! I’ve heard this rumored several times, but have yet to find any evidence toward it. If you find any, please do let me know! I’d love to post them!

Comment