Current Gallery: Victorian & Edwardian / victorianedwardian196

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Current Gallery: Victorian & Edwardian / victorianedwardian196



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  • Gene Tierney as Miranda Wells wearing a Victorian-style dressing gown in the 1946 film "Dragonwyck."
    • Twentieth Century Studios

    Dragonwyck

    1946

    Costume seen on Gene Tierney as Miranda Wells

  • Audrey Dalton as Louise Kendall wearing a Victorian-style dressing gown in the 1952 film "My Cousin Rachel."
    • Twentieth Century Studios

    My Cousin Rachel

    1952

    Costume seen on Audrey Dalton as Louise Kendall

Additional Images

About the Costume

When movie costumes come up for auction, they have often been altered from their original form. In some cases, there are multiple labels, which makes researching a costume’s provenance easier. However, sometimes only the original label exists along with alterations making it evident that the costume was used again, but with no real clue as to where.

This pink dressing gown was purchased from 20th Century Fox (Now 20th Century Studios) by Debbie Reynolds and went up for auction, where it sold for $3750. Gene Tierney wore it as Miranda Wells in the 1946 film Dragonwyck. However, looking at a still from Dragonwyck alongside the current dressing gown, it is obvious that it has undergone some alterations, including the addition of frog closures, a collar, and the removal of some darker fabric on the bodice. Aside from the distinctive quilting of the fabric and confirmation on the tag, it would be extremely easy to overlook this piece as having originated from Dragonwyck at all.   

So how does one go about even finding where this gown turned up in its altered form? There are several ways to at least narrow the options down. First, Dragonwyck was produced in 1946, which was an era when each studio still had its own costume department. This means that costumes from 20th Century Fox productions would generally not wind up in a film produced by MGM. Secondarily, this production takes place in the Victorian Era. So we know we are looking for a movie by 20th Century Fox that takes place in the Victorian Era that was produced after 1946. That tends to narrow down the field.

In this instance, the dressing gown found its way into the 1952 film adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s novel, My Cousin Rachel, where it was worn by Audrey Dalton as Louise Kendall. Whether or not it was used in other instances remains to be seen, though the alterations present in My Cousin Rachel are consistent with those in the auctioned costume. This means the piece was either never used again or never altered with further uses. 

 

About the Costume

Have you seen this gown somewhere else? Do you need to be given credit for this sighting? Do you have corrections, additions or changes you would like to make?

Have you ever watched a film and noticed a character walk by in a gown that you just know you’ve seen before? Recycled Movie Costumes is dedicated to documenting the life of a costume through its various appearances on film and television.

Additional Images

About the Costume

When movie costumes come up for auction, they have often been altered from their original form. In some cases, there are multiple labels, which makes researching a costume’s provenance easier. However, sometimes only the original label exists along with alterations making it evident that the costume was used again, but with no real clue as to where.

This pink dressing gown was purchased from 20th Century Fox (Now 20th Century Studios) by Debbie Reynolds and went up for auction, where it sold for $3750. Gene Tierney wore it as Miranda Wells in the 1946 film Dragonwyck. However, looking at a still from Dragonwyck alongside the current dressing gown, it is obvious that it has undergone some alterations, including the addition of frog closures, a collar, and the removal of some darker fabric on the bodice. Aside from the distinctive quilting of the fabric and confirmation on the tag, it would be extremely easy to overlook this piece as having originated from Dragonwyck at all.   

So how does one go about even finding where this gown turned up in its altered form? There are several ways to at least narrow the options down. First, Dragonwyck was produced in 1946, which was an era when each studio still had its own costume department. This means that costumes from 20th Century Fox productions would generally not wind up in a film produced by MGM. Secondarily, this production takes place in the Victorian Era. So we know we are looking for a movie by 20th Century Fox that takes place in the Victorian Era that was produced after 1946. That tends to narrow down the field.

In this instance, the dressing gown found its way into the 1952 film adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s novel, My Cousin Rachel, where it was worn by Audrey Dalton as Louise Kendall. Whether or not it was used in other instances remains to be seen, though the alterations present in My Cousin Rachel are consistent with those in the auctioned costume. This means the piece was either never used again or never altered with further uses. 

 

When movie costumes come up for auction, they have often been altered from their original form. In some cases, there are multiple labels, which makes researching a costume’s provenance easier. However, sometimes only the original label exists along with alterations making it evident that the costume was used again, but with no real clue as to where.

This pink dressing gown was purchased from 20th Century Fox (Now 20th Century Studios) by Debbie Reynolds and went up for auction, where it sold for $3750. Gene Tierney wore it as Miranda Wells in the 1946 film Dragonwyck. However, looking at a still from Dragonwyck alongside the current dressing gown, it is obvious that it has undergone some alterations, including the addition of frog closures, a collar, and the removal of some darker fabric on the bodice. Aside from the distinctive quilting of the fabric and confirmation on the tag, it would be extremely easy to overlook this piece as having originated from Dragonwyck at all.   

So how does one go about even finding where this gown turned up in its altered form? There are several ways to at least narrow the options down. First, Dragonwyck was produced in 1946, which was an era when each studio still had its own costume department. This means that costumes from 20th Century Fox productions would generally not wind up in a film produced by MGM. Secondarily, this production takes place in the Victorian Era. So we know we are looking for a movie by 20th Century Fox that takes place in the Victorian Era that was produced after 1946. That tends to narrow down the field.

In this instance, the dressing gown found its way into the 1952 film adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s novel, My Cousin Rachel, where it was worn by Audrey Dalton as Louise Kendall. Whether or not it was used in other instances remains to be seen, though the alterations present in My Cousin Rachel are consistent with those in the auctioned costume. This means the piece was either never used again or never altered with further uses. 

 

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Credits

Sighting Credit:
  • Katie S.
Photos provided by:
Costume Designer:
  • René Hubert

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Costume Commentary

    • It’s been altered, but we have proof that they are the same due to the Debbie Reynold’s Auction. The information when the gown was sold said it was from “Dragonwyck” – but clearly it has been made over.

Comment

Costume Commentary

    • It’s been altered, but we have proof that they are the same due to the Debbie Reynold’s Auction. The information when the gown was sold said it was from “Dragonwyck” – but clearly it has been made over.

Comment

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Costume Commentary

    • It’s been altered, but we have proof that they are the same due to the Debbie Reynold’s Auction. The information when the gown was sold said it was from “Dragonwyck” – but clearly it has been made over.

Comment