Current Gallery: Victorian & Edwardian / victorianedwardian076

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    • BBC

    The Buccaneers

    1995

    Costume seen on Rya Kihlstedt as Lizzy Elmsworth

    • Hollywood Pictures
    • Buena Vista Pictures

    Evita

    1996

    Costume seen on Maite Yerro as Juliet

    • BFS Entertainment
    • Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)

    Lady Audley's Secret

    2000

    Costume seen on Neve McIntosh as Lucy, Lady Audley

    • Bavaria Film
    • RTL

    Sophie - Sissis kleine Schwester (Sophie - Sissi's Little Sister)

    2001

    Costume seen on Valerie Koch as Sophie Charlotte

    • BBC

    The Impressionists

    2006

    Costume seen on Isobel Pravda as Camille Monet

Additional Images

About the Costume

This beautiful striped Victorian gown is especially interesting because it is actually based on a gown from works of art by French artist James Tissot. The reproduction gown itself has been seen in at least four films. It was first worn on Rya Kihlstedt as Lizzy Elmsworth in the 1995 production of The Buccaneers. It was seen being worn by Maite Yerro as Juliet on a movie screen in the 1996 film Evita. In 2000 it was worn by Neve McIntosh as Lucy, Lady Audley in Lady Audley’s Secret, and in 2001 it was seen in Sophie – Sissis kleine Schwester (Sophie – Sissi’s Little Sister), being worn by Valerie Koch as Sophie Charlotte. Finally, it was worn by Isobel Pravda as Camille Monet in the 2006 mini-series The Impressionists.

Recycling gowns is hardly new. It has been in practice in film and television since their invention and has been common practice in theatre productions for hundreds of years. In addition, it is also sometimes seen in paintings. Many artists have been known to reuse the clothing that they painted. For example, a yellow house coat trimmed in ermine appears in several paintings by Vermeer. Sometimes the artist owned the actual garment they painted (almost certainly in Vermeer’s case), while other times, it may have been an example from a woman’s magazine that they copied over and over again.

The original gown on which the costume was based was painted not only by James Tissot but it was painted by him numerous times. Tissot was an artist who was mostly known for his paintings of women dressed in their elaborate gowns, and while it is not known if Tissot owned some of the gowns that he repeatedly painted or not, the fact that his parents were both in the Fashion Industry might lead one to believe that his owning them would not have been out of the realm of possibility. In Professor Lou Taylor’s book The Study of Dress History, he writes:

Tissot reused favorite garments over periods of two or three years. Thus the notion that his 1870s paintings reflected the most up-to-date fashions may be flawed.

Five paintings in which Tissot painted this black and white gown include:

  • The Captain and the Mate (c.1873).
  • The Return from the Boating Trip (c.1873).
  • Boarding the Yacht (c.1873), Still on Top (c.1874).
  • Holiday (c.1876).

Go here to see a full gallery of Tissot’s paintings and the beautiful gowns they showcase.

 

About the Costume

Have you seen this gown somewhere else? Do you need to be given credit for this sighting? Do you have corrections, additions or changes you would like to make?

Have you ever watched a film and noticed a character walk by in a gown that you just know you’ve seen before? Recycled Movie Costumes is dedicated to documenting the life of a costume through its various appearances on film and television.

Additional Images

About the Costume

This beautiful striped Victorian gown is especially interesting because it is actually based on a gown from works of art by French artist James Tissot. The reproduction gown itself has been seen in at least four films. It was first worn on Rya Kihlstedt as Lizzy Elmsworth in the 1995 production of The Buccaneers. It was seen being worn by Maite Yerro as Juliet on a movie screen in the 1996 film Evita. In 2000 it was worn by Neve McIntosh as Lucy, Lady Audley in Lady Audley’s Secret, and in 2001 it was seen in Sophie – Sissis kleine Schwester (Sophie – Sissi’s Little Sister), being worn by Valerie Koch as Sophie Charlotte. Finally, it was worn by Isobel Pravda as Camille Monet in the 2006 mini-series The Impressionists.

Recycling gowns is hardly new. It has been in practice in film and television since their invention and has been common practice in theatre productions for hundreds of years. In addition, it is also sometimes seen in paintings. Many artists have been known to reuse the clothing that they painted. For example, a yellow house coat trimmed in ermine appears in several paintings by Vermeer. Sometimes the artist owned the actual garment they painted (almost certainly in Vermeer’s case), while other times, it may have been an example from a woman’s magazine that they copied over and over again.

The original gown on which the costume was based was painted not only by James Tissot but it was painted by him numerous times. Tissot was an artist who was mostly known for his paintings of women dressed in their elaborate gowns, and while it is not known if Tissot owned some of the gowns that he repeatedly painted or not, the fact that his parents were both in the Fashion Industry might lead one to believe that his owning them would not have been out of the realm of possibility. In Professor Lou Taylor’s book The Study of Dress History, he writes:

Tissot reused favorite garments over periods of two or three years. Thus the notion that his 1870s paintings reflected the most up-to-date fashions may be flawed.

Five paintings in which Tissot painted this black and white gown include:

  • The Captain and the Mate (c.1873).
  • The Return from the Boating Trip (c.1873).
  • Boarding the Yacht (c.1873), Still on Top (c.1874).
  • Holiday (c.1876).

Go here to see a full gallery of Tissot’s paintings and the beautiful gowns they showcase.

 

This beautiful striped Victorian gown is especially interesting because it is actually based on a gown from works of art by French artist James Tissot. The reproduction gown itself has been seen in at least four films. It was first worn on Rya Kihlstedt as Lizzy Elmsworth in the 1995 production of The Buccaneers. It was seen being worn by Maite Yerro as Juliet on a movie screen in the 1996 film Evita. In 2000 it was worn by Neve McIntosh as Lucy, Lady Audley in Lady Audley’s Secret, and in 2001 it was seen in Sophie – Sissis kleine Schwester (Sophie – Sissi’s Little Sister), being worn by Valerie Koch as Sophie Charlotte. Finally, it was worn by Isobel Pravda as Camille Monet in the 2006 mini-series The Impressionists.

Recycling gowns is hardly new. It has been in practice in film and television since their invention and has been common practice in theatre productions for hundreds of years. In addition, it is also sometimes seen in paintings. Many artists have been known to reuse the clothing that they painted. For example, a yellow house coat trimmed in ermine appears in several paintings by Vermeer. Sometimes the artist owned the actual garment they painted (almost certainly in Vermeer’s case), while other times, it may have been an example from a woman’s magazine that they copied over and over again.

The original gown on which the costume was based was painted not only by James Tissot but it was painted by him numerous times. Tissot was an artist who was mostly known for his paintings of women dressed in their elaborate gowns, and while it is not known if Tissot owned some of the gowns that he repeatedly painted or not, the fact that his parents were both in the Fashion Industry might lead one to believe that his owning them would not have been out of the realm of possibility. In Professor Lou Taylor’s book The Study of Dress History, he writes:

Tissot reused favorite garments over periods of two or three years. Thus the notion that his 1870s paintings reflected the most up-to-date fashions may be flawed.

Five paintings in which Tissot painted this black and white gown include:

  • The Captain and the Mate (c.1873).
  • The Return from the Boating Trip (c.1873).
  • Boarding the Yacht (c.1873), Still on Top (c.1874).
  • Holiday (c.1876).

Go here to see a full gallery of Tissot’s paintings and the beautiful gowns they showcase.

 

Credits

Sighting Credit:
  • Kiteflier
  • Shrewsbury Lasses
  • Katie S.
Photos provided by:
  • Kiteflier
  • Shrewsbury Lasses
  • Katie S.
  • justprosper
  • Julia Spicer
  • Wikipedia
Costume Designer:
  • Rosalind Ebbutt

Disclaimer

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The films/television shows/books and other media represented in the images on this website do not necessarily reflect the viewpoints of Recycled Movie Costumes. Said media may contain mature content. Viewer discretion is advised at all times.

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